Islam Today

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Quran is for conciliation, not confrontation

 Maulana Wahiduddin Khan I Hindustan Times I October 31, 2001

The reason that is cited most often as a justification for violence is that it is a supremely powerful means of achieving one's objective. But the Quran does not subscribe to this line of thinking. It is very categorical that violence is a negative response that does not yield the desired results. It is neither a useful, nor a positive means of achieving one's objectives, for it only results in death and destruction.

Islam teaches us to 'requite evil with good'

Maulana Wahiduddin Khan I October 30, 2001

AFTER SEPTEMBER 11, a misconception that has gained ground is that Islam allows and even encourages violence. Nothing can be farther from the truth. It's true that Islam permits its followers to fight in self-defence, but that's allowed by all religions and legal systems. Perpetration of violence, though, is altogether another matter. And it's forbidden in Islam.

The Concept of Jihad

Maulana Wahiduddin Khan I The Pioneer I August 17, 1997

Jihad is regularly misconstrued as war, with all its connotations of violence and bloodshed. However, in the Islamic context, and in the literal sense, the word jihad simply means a struggle –doing one’s utmost to further a worthy cause. This is an entirely peaceful struggle, with no overtones even of aggression. The actual Arabic equivalent of war is qital, and even this is meant in a defensive sense.